Me and my speech.


What European American’s value is land, what Native American’s valued was land but a free land understood and used by nations in regards with the needs of the tribe. Now that Native American’s are provided land of reservations, often the poorest and most unfriendly areas, there is limited reason to see value in what is held.

Original Native American’s did possess the land, but in accord with Forbes online article of December 13, 2011, Why Are Indian Reservations So Poor? A Look At The Bottom 1%:

Prosperity is built on property rights, and reservations often have neither [prosperity or property rights]. They’re a demonstration of what happens when property rights are weak or non-existent. . . It’s a look that’s common worldwide, wherever secure property rights are lacking—much of Africa and South America, inner city housing projects and rent-controlled apartment buildings in the U.S., Indian reservations.

Property of land is a key in feeling a connection to life and driving values for people.

Historically, most of today’s federally recognized tribes received federal recognition status through treaties, acts of Congress, presidential executive orders or other federal administrative actions, or federal court decisions.  The Bureau of Indian Affairs for the United States shares details about policies and procedures of the U.S. government in regards to Native Americans.

  • In 1978, the Interior Department issued regulations governing the Federal Acknowledgment Process (FAP) to handle requests for federal recognition from Indian groups whose character and history varied widely in a uniform manner.  These regulations – 25 C.F.R. Part 83 – were revised in 1994 and are still in effect.
  • Also in 1994, Congress enacted Public Law 103-454, the Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act (108 Stat. 4791, 4792), which formally established three ways in which an Indian group may become federally recognized:
    • By Act of Congress,
    • By the administrative procedures under 25 C.F.R. Part 83, or
    • By decision of a United States court.
  • However, a tribe whose relationship with the United States has been expressly terminated by Congress may not use the Federal Acknowledgment Process.  Only Congress can restore federal recognition to a “terminated” tribe.
    • The Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act also requires the Secretary of the Interior to publish annually a list of the federally recognized tribes in the Federal Register
  • According to the U.S. Bureau of the Census, the estimated population of American Indians and Alaska Natives, including those of more than one race, as of July 1, 2007, was 4.5 million, or 1.5 per cent of the total U.S. population.  In the BIA’s 2005 American Indian Population and Labor Force Report, the latest available, the total number of enrolled members of the (then) 561 federally recognized tribes was shown to be less than half the Census number, or 1,978,099.
  • American Indians and Alaska Natives are citizens of the United States and of the individual states, counties, cities, and towns where they reside. 
  • The relationship between federally recognized tribes and the United States is one between sovereigns, i.e., between a government and a government. This “government-to-government” principle, which is grounded in the United States Constitution, has helped to shape the long history of relations between the federal government and these tribal nations.

Ah, but Rhapsodie’s limited research is proving a different fact. The Native American tribes are being treated as states without power away from U.S. federal government control. And while the Civil War was started over States Rights, Rhapsodie is afraid to share these words, because of incorrect interpretations of constitutional privileges by the U.S. government. Oh, wait a moment the U.S. Constitution is being trashed anyway.

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